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Ballycrovane Ogham Stone of Beara
The Ogham Stone, ring of Beara, county Kerry, Ireland. Tuesday, 19 December 2023. Adventures in County Kerry, Ireland. Photos by Thomas Baurley, Techno Tink Media.

Ballycrovane Ogham Stone of Beara

The monument is a carved thin pillar-stone tall granite standing stone with an estimated age of over 2,000 years before the present. It is across the Ballycrovane Quay / Kenmare Bay from the Hag of Beara along the Ring of Beara on the Beara Peninsula.

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Uragh Stone Circle and Famine Cottage
The Uragh Stone Circle, Ring of Kerry, Kerry County, Ireland. Tuesday, 19 December 2023. Adventures in County Kerry, Ireland. Photos by Thomas Baurley, Techno Tink Media.

Uragh Stone Circle and Famine Cottage

While driving the Ring of Kerry and the Ring of Beara, I spied on the maps a stone circle known as Uragh, so I decided to give it a gander. After a twisty country lane drive into the hills and farmlands, following signs to the off-the-map destination, I came to the gate—opened it up—and drove on in. Crossing a raging river with scenic overlooks of lakes and an astounding waterfall in the distance, the site was nothing more than enchanting.

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The Gap of Dunloe
The Gap of Dunloe, Ring of Kerry, Kerry county, Ireland. Tuesday, 19 December 2023. Adventures in County Kerry, Ireland. Photos by Thomas Baurley, Techno Tink Media.

The Gap of Dunloe

Named after the River Loe that runs through it, the "Gap of Dunloe" is derived from the Irish "Dún Lóich," meaning 'Lóich's stronghold' or "gap of the little hollow." This narrow mountain pass was forged by glaciers during the last ice age 25,000 years ago.

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The Shire, Killarney, Co Kerry, Eire
The Shire bar and cafe, Killarney, Kerry, Ireland. Lord of the Rings inspired. Monday, 18 December 2023. Adventures in County Kerry, Ireland. Photos by Thomas Baurley, Techno Tink Media.

The Shire, Killarney, Co Kerry, Eire

A Lord of the Rings inspired pub/bar/cafe in downtown Killarney, county Kerry, Ireland.

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The Fairy-Go-Round Ring Fort, Dingle Peninsula, Co. Kerry, Ireland
Fairy go Round / Fairy Ring Fort, Dingle Peninsula, Ireland. Monday, 18 December 2023. Adventures in County Cork and County Kerry, Ireland. Photos by Thomas Baurley, Techno Tink Media.

The Fairy-Go-Round Ring Fort, Dingle Peninsula, Co. Kerry, Ireland

A tourist-attraction with a petting farm, this privately owned attraction is 10 km west of Dingle in the parish of Kilvickadownig. Its along the world famous Slea Head Drive.  This Ring fort, also known as a "Rath", "Lios", or "Fairy Fort" is a circular ancient pre-Celtic settlement

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Dun Beag Fort (Dingle Peninsula, Co Kerry)

In Irish this means "Little Fort".  It is a  triangular shaped promontory fort measuring 35m along its western side atop the 30 m high cliffs on the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry with distinctive rows of defences and panoramic views over the Dingle Bay of Valentia Island and the Skellig Isles.

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Pike Wood / Mass Rock – County Kerry
Mass Rock, Pike Woods, County Kerry, Ireland. Monday, 18 December 2023. Adventures in County Cork and County Kerry, Ireland. Photos by Thomas Baurley, Techno Tink Media.

Pike Wood / Mass Rock – County Kerry

Mass Rocks: Generally, a "Mass Rock" was used as an altar in the mid-17th century for Catholic masses in Ireland and Scotland or regions where the Protestants persecuted the Catholics. In Irish they were called Carraig an Aifrinn.

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Glastonbury Tor

August 1, 2011: Glastonbury Tor, Glastonbury, England. (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=4287) (c) 2011-2012 - photography by Leaf McGowan, technogypsie.com. Glastonbury Tor, one of the most famous and sacred landmarks in the West Country. From the summit at 158 metres, you can get amazing views over three counties - Somerset, Dorset, and Wiltshire. What is the tor? "Tor" is a West Country word of Celtic origin meaning hill. The conical shape of Glastonbury Tor is natural - due to its rocks. It is made up of horizontal bands of clays and limestone with a cap of hard sandstone. The sandstone resists erosion, but the clays and limestone have worn away, resulting in the steep slopes. A historic landscape: Before modern drainage, the tor in winter would have towered as an island above the flooded Somerset Levels. The terraces on the slopes date back to medieval times when the hillside was one of the few dry places where people could grow crops and graze animals. A place of pilgrimage: The tor has been a place of pilgrimage for over 10,000 years. Many thousands of people still visit each year, some for its links with religion, legends and beliefs, and others because it is such a renowned landmark. History of the Tower: on the summit is St. Michael's Tower, part of a 14th century church. It was built to replace a previous church which had been destroyed by an earthquake in 1275. The second church lasted until the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1539. At this time, the tor was the scene of the hanging of Richard Whiting, the last Abbot of Glastonbury. The Tor was the site of a 6th century settlement, the earliest yet found in Glastonbury. Some believe this was the first Christian community in the area, said to have been founded by Joseph of Arimathea in AD 63. 8th Century: The great Abbey: A stone church was built on the site of the present abbey ruins in the 8th century. It was rebuilt and became one of the wealthiest abbeys in Britain, but was destroyed in 1539

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